Graphics

““There are three responses to a piece of design – yes, no, and WOW! Wow is the one to aim for.”

-Milton Glaser

Graphics is aimed at creative pupils with a genuine interest in new media and design.

Key Stage 3

Pupils study Art in Years 7 to 9 which includes a range of topics and techniques to prepare them for taking GCSE or A Level Graphics as an option.

GCSE

GCSE Graphics involves pupils exploring illustration, animation, and text and image manipulation.

Throughout the course the students will be taught to respond practically to a variety of design briefs, using both traditional methods and new media industry-standard software packages such as Flash MX for computer animation, Photoshop Creative Suite for digital image & text manipulation and Illustrator for vector illustration.

Technology will therefore be an integral part of the course underpinning the outcome of most projects, in one way or another. You do not necessarily need to have any knowledge of the software packages above mentioned.

Despite the ICT element students must be aware that the share of tasks will be 50% ICT & 50% development of traditional media: drawing, painting & modelling.

We offer two residential study trips to Paris and London to enhance coursework operating biannually.

Coursework portfolio
(60% of grade, non-exam assessment – internally assessed and externally moderated)

Candidates are required to submit a Controlled Assessment Portfolio which will be completed over a period of 45 hours (controlled time). The remaining practical work will support this portfolio.

Externally set task
(10 hours, 40% of grade)

The Exam Board sets a wide choice of stimulus questions well in advance to allow for meaningful preparation. Early in the main examination period candidates spend 10 hours, spread over two days to put their ideas into final execution.
Example exam:
Students designed promotional material for dental products to include campaign material. Responses included animations, poster design instruction manuals and booklets.
The topic of the exam changes annually.
Preparation commences in January of Year 11.

A Level

Course Requirements

Good ICT skills are advantageous but not essential. An inquisitive mind and enthusiasm for the subject are recommended, in conjunction with good organisational skills and a desire to succeed.

Course content methodology and assessment

The A Level Graphics course explores the Design process of question-answer by training students to respond to practical briefs and respond to them visually through still and moving imagery.

The course will mainly cover the following areas of study: Animation, Illustration, and Poster Design (Text & Image manipulation).Throughout the course, students will need to respond practically, to a variety of design briefs using both traditional and new media industry standard software packages such as Flash MX for computer animation, Photoshop Creative Suite for digital image and text manipulation and Illustrator for vector illustration. Technology will therefore be an integral part of the course underpinning the outcome of most projects, in one way or another.

You do not necessarily need to have any knowledge of the software packages above mentioned. A number of workshops have been designed to ensure that students, at all different levels, feel comfortable using the different software needed to undertake the coursework tasks.

Despite the ICT element, students must be aware that the share of tasks will be 50% ICT and 50% development of traditional media: drawing, painting, modelling.

Component 1: Personal Investigation
(60% of grade, internally assessed and externally moderated.)

Candidates produce two elements:

  • A portfolio of practical work showing their personal response to either a starting point, brief, scenario, or stimulus, devised and provided by the candidate or centre.
  • A related study of continuous prose with a guided minimum of 1,000 words.

Component 2: Externally set task
(15 hours, 40 % of grade, internally assessed and externally moderated)

The early release paper will be issued in February and will provide candidates with a number of themes, each with a range of written and visual starting points, briefs and stimuli. From these, one must be selected, upon which to base a response.

Beyond Lincoln Minster School

In an increasingly competitive Higher Education market and workplace, universities and employers are not only looking for impressive grades, but also subjects which demonstrate a student’s versatility and a greater breadth of skill and interest.

A Graphics portfolio demonstrates creative skill as well as a strong working knowledge of industry-level software and applications.

Senior School Curriculum

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